Why It Takes Female Founders to Shape the Cannabis Industry for Women

WHY YOU WANT TO LISTEN:

The $13billion cannabis industry is estimated to grow to $30billion in the US by 2025. Our first guest April Pride is known as the godmother of the women in weed movement and host of the podcast How to Do the Pot. She’ll tell us how women in the cannabis industry have lost marketshare, how women consumers have been ignored, and how she’s trying to change that. Our second guest Laura Eisman will tell us how her company Her Highness NYC is packaging up cannabis in solution-specific products including remedies for sleep, sex, and stress.

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ABOUT OUR GUESTS:

April Pride  #dothepot
Instagram: @aprilpride
Twitter: @april_pride
Facebook: April Pride Allison

In January 2016 April Pride founded Van der Pop, which quickly became one of North America’s most recognized cannabis brands. She sold Van der Pop in 2017 to Canopy Growth, the world’s largest cannabis company, where it is currently a top 3 brand.

In Novemeber 2019, April recruited college friend Ellen Scanlon to co-create the podcast How to Do the Pot, a modern woman’s guide to legal cannabis. Produced with an award-winning team (Dirty John, EMBD, Planet Money, Call Your Girlfriend) and with April as host, the show answers women’s most secretly Googled questions about weed.

 

Laura Eisman
Instagram: @herhighnessnyc

Laura Eisman is a several-time entrepreneur, best known for founding Girlshop.com. Purveyor of hundreds of cutting-edge designers, with a flagship store in NYC’s Meatpacking District, Girlshop became fashion’s pioneer e-commerce site. Laura has been written about in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Ad Age, Entrepreneur and People among other publications, and cited as one of 50 New Yorkers to watch. She served as Creative Director at iVillage and Creative Consultant at AOL. Her Highness NYC, which she founded with Allison Krongard, is poised to be the first premier, female cannabis lifestyle brand in the country.

April Pride:
So how is your day going? How's your week going? How is quarantine life treating you?
Nancy:
Good we're talking about weed today.
April Pride:
Why? Because we're all into bizarre or [crosstalk 00:01:32].
Nancy:
No. Namaste. We need to chill out.
April Pride:
Yeah, yeah.
Nancy:
Oh my God.
April Pride:
That's true. Yeah.
Nancy:
Okay. Well, I want to helicopter up to the big business part of what you did, and do. But can I ask you: could you tell us your personal journey? You go to UVA, you go to Parsons, you're learning about serious design. You become an interior decorator, right?
April Pride:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).
Nancy:
And, you say many times, "I smoke every day. This is part of my life, and a good part of my life.” When and how did that happen?
April Pride:
Yeah. I mean, I didn't have my own stash until 2014 when Washington State went adult use legal. So I wasn't a daily, weekly. I didn't smoke unless somebody had some and I was there. So that's a new behavior for me, I guess you could say. And it started because I depended too much on alcohol really, between my first and my second son. That was how I dealt with stress. And I wouldn't drink at home, I didn't drink alone. I didn't drink every day. But when I drink with friends, I drunk and it had an impact on my relationship with my husband. And so when I had my second son, he was sick actually, when he was born. So I promised God that I would do everything right forever, amen. And I was sober for about forever. I was sober. I would drink every once in a while, but I was sober for three years. My husband was just like, "I just don't think it's sustainable for you to think that you're not a sober person. And you're also not in a ditch, right? There are things that alcohol does to complicate our life, but we have to figure out something that allows you to have some kind of balance."
The next year, cannabis became adult use legal and I started consuming without alcohol. I started consuming not in a party environment. And I started to really understand how this could be something that allowed me to find more balance and be more present not as an escape. So I was also undiagnosed ADHD, which explained a lot of why I was finding myself drinking too much, et cetera. So, yeah, it just transformed my life. It really changed how we all interacted with each other around the house. And I had a client with one of my businesses that had started working in the cannabis space and she was like, "There's no one that's creating anything for women. There's no one that's creating anything with a designer's eye. And you should think about this."
April Pride:
So, even at that time, I wasn't really consuming that regularly. I saw it more as an opportunity as a creative to do something to make the rules and break the rules. I couldn't believe that New York and LA creatives hadn't been all over this. And so that started it and then getting into the industry, you have access to more cannabis. You're curious about what everyone's talking about, you need to be able to talk about and share learnings with consumers. Yeah, it's another journey, right? I can't say that I don't have to watch my addictive tendencies. So that's something that is ongoing in terms of the gut check. Is this helping or hurting the situation?
Nancy:
So you're self taught, in large part?
April Pride:
Oh, I've got so many mentors that have taken me under their wing. But yes, I'm exploring this on my own and there's a lot of people who are not new to weed, but new to the industry. And yeah, we share, I guess, best practices.
Nancy:
They’re best practices. Well, I want to talk about what's considered the industry. There was a Newsweek cover story. This is 2 015, called Women in Weed. How legal marijuana could be the first billion dollar industry not dominated by men. And you were there, Van der Pop, which was so beautiful that you began in 2016. But by 2019, here's the next headline, women are getting shut out of the 12.2 billion cannabis industry. What happened between 2015 and 2019, when you were right in the center of it?
April Pride:
Capital sources, right? So in 2015, I was working on the business plan and in 2016, January we launched.
Nancy:
Did you raise money?
April Pride:
I raised $50,000, we put in our own money and then I raised $25,000 from two different sources. So we raised about 100 grand.
Nancy:
Okay. Okay.
April Pride:
My husband has a job though, right? So we could continue to pay child care, we can continue to pay our mortgage. I think it's important to be honest about the whole financial picture. So between that time, in between 2015 and 2019, Canada became legal. And so I sold my company into Canada in February 2017. And it's been federally legal for medical use in Canada since 2001. So licensed producers have been ... They were already publicly traded companies. There was a ton of money. When the US investors started seeing the opportunity, it just became harder and harder for women to win because we didn't have as much access to capital. So it's just that simple. Truly.
Nancy:
So you're saying at the point at which it started being perceived as big business.
April Pride:
Yes.
Nancy:
The venture capitalists came in, the money guys, and they were for the large part guys. And they gave money to other guys.
April Pride:
Yeah, you invest in what ... If you don't understand weed, you understand men. You trust men, if you're a man. They don't understand women's businesses. They don't understand our needs. And so yeah, here we are again. Yeah.
Nancy:
All right. I'm going to try not to go into a deep depression at this moment.
April Pride:
It's going to be okay.
Nancy:
Because there is still the great opportunity, which you saw early on and which is now your mission, both with your podcast and with your consulting work. That women have been pushed out to some degree as owners and business people in the cannabis business. But now we have women as consumers, which is something you've really taken on. So that's what I want us to talk about, is all the ways this could be made a consumer market. For one thing, women I think, on the large part are solution driven. Okay, my sex, sex, sex. I don't even have sex. Sleep, I don't have sleep. It could be pre-party anxiety. I never give a dinner party because I have a breakdown. I mean, think of all those situations where women just go, "Can I have some help here.” And it goes directly to something I want to fix. Because that's female to me.
April Pride:
Yes.
Nancy:
That's female.
April Pride:
Condition based products, right? So when Van der Pop launched, we had nine categories, if you will. There were the nine powers of cannabis. So sleep, sex, to clean, actually. To relax. It goes on and on, to play, to party. And so talking about products as solutions that spoke to those challenges, those conditions that were challenges in your life. If you go into dispensaries, the stores are organized some of them by those conditions and then the products are in those departments, so that you can see to sleep. It's not just choosing the right strain. You can use a gel cap. You can use a spray, like a breath spray. You can use a sublingual tincture. There are so many more non-combustible, user friendly options to treat your conditions. Yeah.
Nancy:
Okay. So now imagine, let's say I could even get into one of those stores because I live in one of the few states where it's legal, and they're all in that department. How would I know which one to pick?
April Pride:
So that is a great question. I want to just back up quickly, the reason it is so important that we have women, a diverse range of women, whether it's age, race, life experience, socioeconomic, all of it at every step of the supply chain in cannabis, is because we cannot ... If know that men can't understand what our priorities are in terms of our health and happiness, we can't assume that a woman that doesn't look like us or live like us also understands. We need someone speaking for all women.
Nancy:
Yeah, an advocate.
April Pride:
An advocate. The person who is the gatekeeper really, both for brands and for consumers are budtenders, the sales representative, the person that's there to answer your questions. So let's say you go in and you're asked, you have issues with sleep. They can't say this will help you sleep. They can say, users or customers report that this tincture after using it for a couple of weeks, let's say, will start to help you sleep more regularly or fall asleep. Sleep through the night, whatever it might be. It's you can say customers report that. But what's happening is that customers go in and they want to have all the answers, they want to know exactly what it can do and how it will affect their body. And that's medical advice that budtender just can't give.
April Pride:
So the disconnect is that customers need more information, they need actual medical advice. Budtenders can't give it. When dispensaries first opened, budtenders were power users. They are people that use on a daily basis and they like high THC. And the customers that were going in that didn't want to have a 40 milligram drink, they needed something much lower dose, were going in and getting products that were not only not going to help them for their condition, but we're also going to make cannabis something that they never went back to, because they weren't having their best cannabis outcome. That's what we say. So I think that there's this disconnect, your budtender is your barista. They need to know your name. They need to know about the last experience that you had with cannabis. They need to know what medications you're on. But you're probably not going to tell them your medications, right?
April Pride:
So there's a real problem with what consumers need and what the person who's standing there in the store can actually help them with.
Nancy:
So what is the solution? In doing research on you, find that there had been some shop at home companies started by women, which makes complete sense to me that by having like a Tupperware party, but what you're trying is a tincture versus the spray. It gave you a way in a safe space to preview product and even try product. What is the answer to getting the right connection between women customers who wanted solution based…
April Pride: Well, when Van Der Pop launched in January 2016... We had accessories to store smoke and share cannabis. I'm a designer by training, right? That's what I'm passionate about. That's what I understand. So with the accessories, what can Van der Pop was trying to do was to have it look like something else on your Vanity or something in your closet, so that you could connect with it emotionally. It was something that you recognize. Or didn't remind you of your boyfriend in college that you wanted to forget.
And what I learned within three months of launch is that, women didn't understand weed. I was starting to understand how the plant worked with women's bodies in a very specific way. And we changed our business to focus on how we were communicating with women and the information that we were choosing to share relevant to what they needed to understand how it would fit into their lives. Otherwise, it was just kind of like, "I don't know what I'm supposed to do here."
So within 10 months, we realized we didn't have an accessories company, we had an education platform. And that's really why I sold the company because we didn't have any products that people were going to be buying until they understood more about the plant that went into the storage jars, that went into the locked stash bag, so your kids couldn't get into it. We had a lot of work to do to build the confidence of our consumers. And so right now what ... So at that time, what happened is we adopted education as our marketing strategy.
Nancy:
Where's the money in that?
April Pride:
Exactly that's why I had to sell my company, because. But now Van der Pop now has weed in Canada. They did during medical. So they're making money.
Nancy:
I went to the website up there. So basically you had the beautiful containers, you were making it acceptable. Yeah, to put it on my dressing table to have it in my house, but there weren't enough women who knew how to even use the stuff to have the package, the container to put it in. So we're still at that. To me, it feels like we're still at that place. 
April Pride:
Yeah, you've totally hit on something. I'd say through 2018, what we were really doing was trying to reduce stigma around choosing cannabis as an alternative to other options that maybe it's a prescription drug to help you sleep that had other side effects, that you couldn't take anymore. Maybe you, like me, were looking to reduce your alcohol consumption. But there's still stigma, there's more stigma around weed and choosing that. Then there is drinking wine at night.
April Pride:
So 2018 all the headlines were about CBD, and it became more mainstream to talk about this. And you had people who never thought that they would try a cannabis product, feeling more educated, feeling like they had a better understanding of what this was all about. And so now the podcast, when I left Van der Pop last year, I started a podcast called How to Do the Pot, we launched at the end of November. And that is all about making sure that you now understand how to use products available in legal markets. Because we don't really have to worry as much about stigma, because the conversation is now opened up. Cannabis as an essential service has definitely propelled us into this place where we don't have to convince women as much, it's more, we just need to make sure they have a good experience and they get the right product.
Nancy:
Okay, is it possible for you to write a handy handbook for women? I mean, can you do a book?
April Pride:
I mean, the [crosstalk 00:27:09].
Nancy:
Okay, let me tell everyone. I've listened to your podcast, and it's great. There are women and they're going, "Okay, I use this much blah, blah, blah." They're sharing, which is what women do and that's how we figure things out. So they're in there saying, "I couldn't sleep. So I tried this." So that's information. That's service. That's the beginning of making it useful to that women market, which once I swear. Once this is figured out, and I'm hoping April, you might step up to the plate on this. Once it's figured out, the gates will go wide open, I believe, because we freaking need it in the right package, and knowing where it's come from, and that we're not going to go on some head trip. I went to West land way back where the Grateful Dead came one weekend to Wesleyan, and then gave brownies to everyone on campus, with something in it. So the whole ... It made the front page of the New York Times. And nobody knew what they were getting into.
Nancy:
Anyway, cut forward. Now, I just see real pent up demand for these products, and including from women who are proper women who would love to use something that would help them sleep, or help them feel less anxious. I mean, that they really would love to do it. And they'd even want to invest in companies that are bringing these products to women. If someone could explain it to them, and show them the way to a predictable marketplace.
April Pride:
Right. So again, the podcast is called How to Do the Pot and it is a narrative based podcast, right? We tell the stories of women because we are lacking research. There's just not enough research because it hasn't been legal. So the only way to share the best practices of other women is to have them tell you and-
Nancy:
Story telling.
April Pride:
Yeah, it's not a q&a. I mean, it is really the words of women telling us what's worked for them. But the answer is that you're going to have to try a few things before you get it right, and tinctures, a CBD tincture which you can buy online and have shipped to your house because it does not have THC which is this psychoactive cannabinoid. I mean, there's a language that you have to learn and there are brands, so many CBD brands are founded and managed by women. And we want to make sure that those are the brands that other women are choosing. Because if you could just listen to how these founders came into the space, their personal ... It's usually because they have somebody they loved that had a health crisis and cannabis was the last thing they found and the first thing that worked. And the formulations are made with a lot of love. Yeah.
Nancy:
April, do you have a list of the women-owned companies on your website?
April Pride:
We have. Yes, so we take everything from our podcasts, which we have six in season one that are 30 minutes long, and then we've just released five mini episodes. And we follow up on our website with Listicles called the High Five which are five practical tactical tips to do the pot, and we do give product recommendations based on conditions and products that we tried. So we are shipped products, we try them and then we recommend them.
Nancy:
Okay, that's really important to get out there because [crosstalk 00:31:06].
April Pride:
It's dothepot.com.
Nancy:
I do think you should have a book.
April Pride:
Tell me how-
Nancy:
Books do matter.
April Pride:
Books do matter. I believe that and I think a handbook is great. I mean, the first chapter would be, everybody's body is different. Women's bodies are different. Their hormones are different throughout the month. Therefore, your reaction to THC in particular is going to vary based on your hormone levels. Right?
Nancy:
Cool. Right.
April Pride:
It's a lot to know about yourself before you can really dial it in.
Nancy:
Okay. I want to underline what you just said that there really isn't research. So at this point, we have to rely on storytelling, women-to-women, correct?
April Pride:
Yes. And really what we're offering women is the freedom of choice, right? Teach them to fish. Whether it's teach them to consume weed or to use the internet.
Nancy:
But then once women got into it, women dominated.
April Pride:
Oh, yeah. Right. Including you.
Nancy:
But as the consumer of the internet, they dominated. Which is what I always thought. I think that's why I'm so excited about what you're doing, because I think women will dominate.

END

Interview with Laura Eisman, CoFounder of Her Highness NYC:

Nancy Evans:
Welcome, Laura Eisman. I need to tell everybody that Laura and I way back. And we go way back in the most interesting ways that I think speaks to what Laura's doing now and why she's doing it. Which is, let's go back to the beginning. Laura was the art director, design director at a lot of important magazines back when magazines ruled the world. And she and I met when I started a magazine called Family Life. She came on to art direct. And Family Life, the reason I started it, and this goes to the recurring theme in Laura's and my life, is that I looked what was on the news stands for parents. And it was all white, all women, and the people never went outside the house. And it was just this 1950s really weird picture, and I wanted to switch it up.
Nancy Evans:
Then cut to my next project, is called iVillage, and, boom, Laura comes over. Comes over to that enterprise where, again, we are going up a steep hill to bring women onto the internet. And the internet at that point was kind of really creepy, and there was no design ethic, let alone consumer friendly content.So while we're doing that, Laura, who's art director, is over at her computer screen. And when I would go by I would see this really pretty stuff. It didn't really have anything to do with iVillage. She was beginning to create the next iteration of going to a place where people would go, "What do you mean?" People weren't purchasing anything online then. Which was she started a commerce play called Girlshop which curated independent, really cool designers, put them online and made available to the whole country, and, theoretically, the whole world, really cool fashion that you'd have to live in New York and go down the Lower East Side to find.
Nancy Evans:
And Laura can talk more about that, but the trail here is that at every point she joined me and then went off on her own to always go where no one was. Each of these enterprises took a leap of logic, really, to create something that was not yet there. And Laura really did that with Girlshop which, to this day, is the pioneer of commerce online. So let's begin with that story, Laura, of you creating Girlshop at iVillage and then one day you go, "Okay, Nancy, I'm leaving."
Laura Eisman: b
Okay. I, first of all, I thought I was much more discreet.
Nancy Evans:
No, I was always wandering around. I [crosstalk 00:05:28]-
Laura Eisman:
Okay, we never talked about that. But, actually, in the freelance stuff I had after iVillage they actually asked me to leave, because I was too involved in my little project at the time. I learned from the best, I mean, I always called you my mentor. And just hearing you say all of this, out loud, and putting it together in this stream, it's even more clear. And before I joined you today, I was thinking about, "Is there a book, and is there an inspirational something that really put me on my journey?" And all I could think about was Nancy Evans, and I just think that you were ... Without me realizing it, maybe at the time you were the perfect role model for me.
Nancy Evans:
Well, thank you.
Laura Eisman:
And growing up, I never had this intention to be an entrepreneur.
Nancy Evans:
Me, neither.
Laura Eisman:
It only happened when I saw that there was something that wasn't happening and while I was at iVillage there was a point where I was also working at Marie Claire magazine, and this was the launch of Marie Claire from France into the US. And so I was on this launch team and you're seeing a pattern. I'm always launching something. And just being so close to the fashion closet and seeing all the fashion that came through those doors and I just thought, "There is no way to see a collection of a designer.”
Laura Eisman:
And then, working at iVillage which was just uphill learning. I feel like we learned every thing within a few weeks. It was just super intense actually being part of figuring out what the internet was going to be. You know, iVillage was the first community for women…
Nancy Evans:
Right.
Laura Eisman:
And I took that and I thought, "You know, if it can be a community, then we can create commerce.” I approached [inaudible 00:16:45] Cynthia Rowley, Betsey Johnson-
Nancy Evans:
Love her.
Laura Eisman:
... really a handful of the well-known designers, and then I went in deeper to the independent designers. And that sort of became my specialty. And some, you know, the fashion industry, at least back then, was pretty behind in technology. I remember even doing ... Like emails were so new and I would have to fax orders to them. I don't even think they had email. So I made a prototype. I learned HTML which was probably much easier than Rainman.
Nancy Evans:
Okay. Rainman, everyone, was what we had to use on AOL in the early days and we had to learn that. And it had like, do you remember, like 12 fonts. We came from magazines, we would say, "Wait a minute, don't you have Garamond?" And they went, "Who are you?"
Laura Eisman:
I know, but I think we helped them along a little bit, because they-
Nancy Evans:
Well, yeah.
Laura Eisman:
Yes, absolutely.
Nancy Evans:
We also helped them make money.
Laura
yep.
Nancy Evans:
Which leads us to now.
Laura Eisman:
Yes. My current business is Her Highness. And it's a cannabis lifestyle brand for women. This was also something that I became extremely passionate about. I love cannabis, I have always been kind of an occasional user, and I followed the market. And it became popular and getting legal in several states. I know I watched Colorado, and Oregon, and especially California. And I watched how it was changing and how the products were becoming more nuanced and everyone trying to be higher-end. But higher-end meant black box with gold foil across the board. Like that was sort of like, "Let's elevate this," but it was all very generic and nobody was saying a thing.
Nancy Evans:
Was that because, no offense meant, but was that because men were designing the black box with the gold?
Laura Eisman:
Probably. I don't think they were ... I mean, they said that women were involved, and they were saying this was such a great opportunity for women, but really I found that once I was in it, there weren't women. There were some women, but there were many more men. The women, as customers, were getting lost. The statistic, when I started like four years ago was that 40% of customers were women. Now the statistic is 50%. And I'm sure it's more, and as we know, women are just an important force in any purchasing decisions whether it's for themselves or for others.
Nancy Evans:
And also they are our word of mouth marketing machine.
Laura Eisman:
Word of mouth is number one in marketing with women. Number one.
Nancy Evans:
Right. Right.
Laura Eisman:
So anyway with my partner, Alison Krongard, we were both entrepreneurs. We both loved cannabis in different levels, I'll say. But we really bonded over this, and watching the market, and wanting to be involved in some way. And we saw that nobody was addressing women and it was a completely underserved market. We wanted to, as I guess, always do in my fashion and in her as well, is we wanted to get out there in a big way. There were some women's lines and are, but they'll be very specific to a category. So they'll do, you know, there will be a vape company, or they'll focus on sexual wellness, for example, and we really just set out to be the lifestyle brand for women in cannabis. There's a group which we all are at some point called the canna-curious. So it's a term, I wish I could take credit for that term-
Nancy Evans:
That's not your term? It's such a great term.
Laura Eisman:
It's such a great term. I mean, I'd like to think we made it up, but we didn't. I feel like we heard it before, I feel like we've taken some ownership of using it frequently. But yeah, canna-curious, and especially now with the recent legalization we're all so curious about cannabis. You know, it's healthier. I think a lot of people are afraid because, especially women, you may have had a bad experience in the past, or just your memory of what pot was when you were in college or whenever in your life you may have used it. It's in your memory, and it's so different now. So there's definitely this education that needs to happen and it-
Nancy Evans:
Can I just reflect back some of your own words, which I think are wonderful? You say that Her Highness is the on-ramp for the canna-curious. And then, you said your goal is to become the trusted brand that helps guide women through this new frontier.
Laura Eisman:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). That's exactly what we're setting out to do. And we have a CBD collection as well, and I think that's kind of the first baby step for many people. And then we go into the THC, but we start ... We have a variety of products, not all of them get you high, in fact, a lot of them do not. And it's just about learning about cannabis and trying things, and that's exactly it. You need a girlfriend, you need a trusted source. We know it's kind of daunting. And, I'd say, the dispensary, having come from retail, the dispensary experience is not so friendly to women.
Nancy Evans:
Okay. That interests me, too. Okay, everyone, I'm like the clueless person. I'm the canna-curious, because some of the things that you're marketing, particularly in the not getting high segment of products is right up women's alley of when you feel a little anxious, a little tense, a little overwhelmed. Some of your products can just like take a beat.
Laura Eisman:
Yeah, I mean, a few of our products basically take the edge off. So we're also trying to get women away from drinking too much and taking pills… During quarantine and when I was super nervous about corona. Nothing would help like these mints — our Manage-Mints.
Nancy Evans:
I love the name.
Laura Eisman:
And truly… We call them, because we were giving a Highly name to everything, we call them Highly You, But Better. And that's truly what they are, because it doesn't really change you even with the THC. It's something you could do during the day if you have a little bit of stress. It just really evens you out.
Nancy Evans:
Okay, having worked with Laura so many times, there's nothing she does that isn't completely beautiful. So, it wasn't a surprise that all of Her Highness materials are gorgeous, but they really are gorgeous. So here is the Her Highness Deluxe Box. Okay. And it opens with like a magnetic latch… okay, and another beautiful packaging.
Laura Eisman:
Vape pens actually were our first products that we designed. And really, we wanted to reinvent the vape pen. And our vape pen, the presentation is beautiful. You pull out the little drawer and you have electro gold plated vape pen which is an oil cartridge and a battery that's together as one piece. And you get a USB charger which is also gold plated, which no one's ever thought to do. And actually, when we went to gold plate the USB, they were like, "What? You want to what? What is wrong with a generic black USB?" We're like, "Oh."
Nancy Evans:
Yeah, no. Okay, it says, "CBD and female friendly herbs relieves headaches, hangovers, cramps, pains, and bullshit." Like if you've been in a bad meeting. Okay, is that great? All right. So there's a purpose to it. See, that's very, I think, very women. You know, like we're very kind of functional and practical? So there's a need and you solve it. And wait until you hear… Who’s your copywriter? Is it you?
Laura Eisman:
We do a lot of the copywrite.
Nancy Evans:
Okay, because this is, "Elevated luxuries for women, established 2019." P.S. anyone out there, I love when you have "established" in your whatever. Put that on your company's name, I think that's great. And then, on the inside of the box it says, "Lit for a queen." Get it?
Nancy Evans:
Perfect. So as you can all see, humor is part of the brand.
Laura Eisman:
I think that is part of removing the stigma, and that's a huge mission of ours is to remove the stigma. And we'll just add in some funny, old school language to kind of just make it normal.
Nancy Evans:
To make it normal. And I really recommend that you all go to Laura's website for Her Highness. Because the copy, back to making this normalized and it's got so much humor and so much turns of phrase, it's a pleasure to read. Okay, everyone, I hope you feel inspired by this and okay, Laura, thank you so much for being here.

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You'll also get our exclusive reading list, latest episodes, and the best takeaways from featured entrepreneurs curated by host Nancy Evans and delivered to your inbox.
GET THE LIST »
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